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'Making and Note-taking' focusses on my explorations during the beginning of this project. In Chapter Five of my Dissertation, I discuss my navigations regarding the use of water and ocean water within my artistic practice and how water became incorporated within my  cyanotype - making. This section is situated within and reflects back upon such findings. It introduces the in situ nature that oftentimes accommodated my art making processes and also presents my initial 'Field Notes' for this project.

 

 

'Five Liter To's and Fro's', 2020

video

This video piece reflects upon my back and forth trips to retrieve ocean water for printing via the use of 5 liter plastic waters bottles. As I note in Chapter Five, " These plastic items became valuable containers that were filled and refilled, usually with ocean water for printing..." (Obermeyer.C, 2020 : 87)

 

 

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'Five Liter Highs and Lows', 2019 - 2020 

cyanotypes on fabriano, 35 x 49 cm EACH

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'WATER', 2019 - 2020

cyanotypes on fabriano, 22,8 x 29,5cm EACH

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'Ebb and Flow', 2020

video

This video shows the ebb and flow in the ever - changing meeting points between sea and land. In Chapter Three, I note: "Shorelines and areas where terrestrial surfaces meet the sea are the places where most humans have their furthermost prominent physical interactions and experiences with the ocean" (Obermeyer, C, 2020: 37).

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'Field Notes: Found Ashore', 2019 - 2020

cyanotypes on fabriano, 20 x 23cm EACH

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'Field Notes: of Sands and Froths', 2019 - 2020

 cyanotypes on fabriano, 20 x 23cm EACH

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'Seeing, Making', 2020

video

In Chapter Five, I explain how cyanotypes are resultant from light sensitive chemistry that is applied to a surface, exposed to ultraviolet light and then developed through oxidisation. The chemicals used are Ammonium Ferric Citrate and Potassium Ferricyanide. In the book ‘Sun Gardens: Cyanotypes by Anna Atkins’, it is noted: “The only other compound involved is one that is often taken for granted: water. Simply washing the exposed cyanotype brings out its rich blue colour and makes the print permanent.’ (Schaaf, 2018: 63).

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'Field Notes: Submerged and Exposed', 2019 - 2020

cyanotypes and inkjet prints on fabriano, 20 x 23cm EACH